Last edited by Doule
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

2 edition of On the longevity of mammalian species in the Tertiary. found in the catalog.

On the longevity of mammalian species in the Tertiary.

Björn Kurtén

On the longevity of mammalian species in the Tertiary.

by Björn Kurtén

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  • 6 Currently reading

Published in Helsingfors .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Mammals, Fossil.,
  • Paleontology -- Tertiary.

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesSocietas Scientiarum Fennica. Commentationes biologicae,, XXI, 4, Commentationes biologicae ;, XII, 4.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQ60 .F553 vol. 21, no. 4
    The Physical Object
    Pagination13, [1] p.
    Number of Pages13
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL222608M
    LC Control Numbera 65000204
    OCLC/WorldCa13070725

    Longevity Secrets of The Naked Mole Rat Twitter Facebook Pinterest LinkedIn Email The naked mole rat is the longest-living rodent known and can live an astonishing 16x longer than regular rats.   The objective of this study was to examine the possible involvement of oxygen free radicals in the aging process. Rates of mitochondrial O 2.− and H 2 O 2 production and oxygen consumption in the kidney and the heart were compared among seven different mammalian species namely, mouse, hamster, rat, guinea pig, rabbit, pig, and cow, whose maximum life span potential .

    described yet. Generally, in most mammalian species including human, females live longer than males [27,28]. The biggest known difference in longevity between sexes among mammals has been described in short-finned pilot whale, where females live nearly twice as long as males [29], whereas only a small effect of sex was. Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books. My library.

    Comparative studies among mammalian species confirm that cells from long-lived species appear to have a greater intrinsic capacity to withstand stresses than cells from short-lived species. Childbearing at older ages has become increasingly common in modern societies because of demographic changes, medical progress and personal choice. Mammalian diversity in the Northern Hemisphere, measured at the family level, reached a maximum in the Miocene (the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum), particularly reflecting a radiation of several lineages of ungulates and rodents. Through the remainder of the Tertiary, the diversity of large ungulates decreased as the climate became cooler and dryer.


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On the longevity of mammalian species in the Tertiary by Björn Kurtén Download PDF EPUB FB2

The biomedical sciences have been remarkably successful in dealing with exogenously originating pathologies such as infectious diseases.

This success, however, has uncovered a more formidable Cited by: Abstract. The replicative life spans of mammalian fibroblasts in vitro were studied in a number of cell cultures representing eight species.

Emphasis was placed on determining the population doubling level at which phase III (a period of decrease in the rate of proliferation) and chromosomal alterations by: Longevity of mammals in captivity; from the Living Collections of the world A list of mammalian longevity in captivity.

pages, 21x30cm, g Language: English (Kleine Senckenberg-Reihe, Band 48) ISBNpaperback, price: € in stock and ready to shipCited by: Mammalian Species' sister journal presents a specially curated collection of content selected by the Journal of Mammalogy Editor-in-Chief. Read now. Become an ASM member.

Your membership supports ASM activities such as the production of the Journal of Mammalogy and Mammalian Species. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, specifically at complex I (Cx I), has been widely suggested to be one of the determinants of species longevity. The present study follows a comparative approach to analyse complex I in heart tissue from 8 mammalian species with a longevity ranging from to 46 : Natalia Mota-Martorell, Mariona Jove, Irene Pradas, Isabel Sanchez, José Gómez, Alba Naudi, Gustavo.

Membrane lipid composition is an important correlate of the rate of aging of animals and, therefore, the determination of their longevity. In the present work, the use of high-throughput technologies allowed us to determine the plasma lipidomic profile of 11 mammalian species ranging in maximum longevity from to years.

Models of hominid diversity (numbers of species) are constructed using fossil mammalian longevity data, mammalian speciation rates and living primate and carnivore spatial patterns.

These models are discussed in the context of the longevity of the hominid lineage, its geographical distribution, and its adaptive basis. Selected species were labeled. Adult body mass and maximum lifespan records of mammalian species used to make the figure are from AnAge Database (Tacutu et al., ).

(B) Some recently sequenced species with remarkable longevity. Animal sketches are not drawn to scale. (C) Comparative omics studies across mammalian species. Animal sketches. Linear regression of species longevity on log-transformed branch-specific dN/dS ratio was performed using terminal branches only.

Then, for each internal branch of the tree, ancestral longevity was predicted based on estimated dN/dS ratio. Results. The phylogeny of the 33 placental mammalian species used in this study is shown in figure 1. The extent of this effect, and its impact on date estimates, is unknown.

Fast rates early in the mammalian radiation could make molecular date estimates systematically too old. There is a clear need for analyses that test the robustness of mammalian molecular date.

This is illustrated in Fig. 1 which shows that while the maximum longevity of bird species tends to be shorter in birds with a higher metabolic rate, as it is in mammals, in birds the relationship differs from that observed in mammals, Bird species have a longer maximum lifespan than that expected for a mammalian species with the same metabolic.

Longevity data (maximal lifespan) were taken from the AnAge data base (de Magalaes et al., ). Longevity data were available for mammalian species, and bird species, represented in our cytochrome b database.

The manually-curated AnAge data base provides longevity records corresponding to maximal life spans, mostly observed in captivity. Humans have the longest maximum lifespan potential of any mammalian species and also appear to consume more energy over this lifespan on a per-weight basis than any other species (Cutler, a).

These two unique biological characteristics of humans are the result of an unusually slow aging rate. There is a positive correlation among animals, especially mammalian species, between body size and life-span. (Figure II). Life-span, especially maximal life-span is significantly affected by the genetic set of individuals and hence it is sensible to investigate for longevity assurance genes.

On the other hand, the diversity of lifespans of organisms living on earth is also astonishing. The maximum longevity of different species can vary by fold in mammals and by fold or sometimes even more if we include in the list the lifespan of invertebrates and mammals. The longevity often correlates with body mass (Figure 1A).

For these reasons, if there was a concerted increase in mammalian size between the late Cretaceous and early Tertiary, or if larger mammals have been disproportionately sampled, then molecular date estimates of the ordinal level radiation of mammals could have been systematically misled [16, 23–26].

While the widespread rate variation. There is little doubt that HSF1 and the pathways of protein quality control are closely coupled to the mechanisms that ensure longevity in non-mammalian and mammalian species.

There is also strong evidence indicating that HSPs protect a range of human cell types from protein damage and deter loss of function and cell death during aging by. Thus, the physiological and biochemical nature of mammalian aging is qualitatively similar in different species because of common mechanisms of causation.

It then follows that mechanisms determining extent of health maintenance or life span are “active” in nature and operate by reducing the time-dependent accumulation of these “passive.

Mammalian lifespans range from one year or less to 70 or more years in the wild. Bowhead whales may live more than years. (Grzimek, ) Behavior. Mammalian behavior varies substantially among species.

That notion was also consistent with the pattern of interspecific differences in mammalian longevity as larger species typically have lower basal mass-specific metabolic rates and live longer than.

Inthe mammals were comprehensively revised by Malcolm C. McKenna and Susan K. Bell, which has resulted in the McKenna/Bell classification. Their book, Classification of Mammals above the Species Level, is a comprehensive work on the systematics, relationships and occurrences of all mammal taxa, living and extinct, down through the rank of genus, though molecular genetic data.Accordingly, the fold differences in aging rate among the mammalian species could be determined in part by peroxidation defense processes.

This possibility was tested by measuring the spontaneous autoxidation of aerobically incubated brain and kidney tissue homogenates of 24 different mammalian species as a function of their maximum lifespan.PDF | On Jan 1,Best T.

and others published Sciurus yucatanensis. Mammalian Species | Find, read and cite all the research you need on ResearchGate.